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Guide Two German Crowns: Monarchy and Empire in Medieval Germany

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This is made manifest in the words inscribed on the guard of the so-called sword of St Maurice: Christ conquers, Christ reigns, Christ commands. We need to recognize the play on words here. The Christ in question is the German king, handed the sword directly after he had been anointed as Christus domini , almost certainly on the head and with holy chrism.

For Hohenstaufen and Welf kings did not pass up the opportunity to exploit the resonances of the liturgy in the construction of their authority. Like that of their Plantagenet and Capetian counterparts, theirs remained a liturgical kingship.

German society, economy, and culture in the 14th and 15th centuries

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Before 1556

Permissions Icon Permissions. Abstract The Gregorian reform movement in general, and events at Canossa in in particular, have been credited with tarnishing the lustre of sacral kingship within the Empire. Open in new tab Download slide. The Reichsschwert so-called Sword of St. Table Open in new tab. I am also indebted to the Arts and Humanities Research Council for the studentship that funded the doctoral research from which this essay subsequently developed. Bisson ed. Ralph de Diceto, The Historical Works , ed. Stubbs, 2 vols. As Matthew Paris imparts this information in a rubric it is not included in the Rolls Series edition of the Chronica Majora.

On the iron crown see R.

Schramm ed. Delaborde ed.

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dalgefanliako.cf - The History of Germany - German Royalty

This idea is forcefully expressed in S. For the influence of ritual studies on German medieval studies see F. Goez and J. Jarnut ed.


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  • Two German Crowns. Monarchy and Empire in Medieval Germany.
  • Among other important contributions see T. Nelson ed. Medieval Polities , pp. Duggan ed. For example, see M. Steinicke and S. Weinfurter ed. Althoff, J. Fried and P. Geary ed. The imperial texts are contained in R. Elze ed. Vogel and R. Vatican, — Imperatoris , ed. Germanistische Abteilung , , pp. Imperatoris , p. Mierow New York, , p.

    ___ Outline of Germany's History

    Schnith and R. Pauler ed. For the view that papal involvement was less decisive in the election than previously assumed, see U. Vollrath and S. Weinfurter eds , Festschrift Odilo Engels Cologne, , pp. Jahrhundert , p. I am not aware of any source from this period that explicitly states that a king cannot be inaugurated at certain times of the liturgical year, but that Lent would be considered inappropriate seems likely, considering, for example, the rules for marriage. Matthew Paris, Chronica Majora , ed. Luard, 7 vols. Gerhoh of Reichersberg, Commentarius in Psalmos , ed.

    On the feast commemorating the capture of Jerusalem, see S. Wattenbach ed. Karl Pertz ed. Bolton and A. Studies and Texts Aldershot, , pp.

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    Elze, Die Ordines , p. On the Liber see R. Hamilton and H. I owe thanks to Henry Parkes for sharing his work with me in advance of its publication. Vogel and Elze eds , Le pontifical romano-germanique , vol. In his edition of the imperial ordines , Elze includes fifteen distinct texts he dates as being from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries texts IX-XX. Elze, Die Ordines , pp. This passage is quoted by almost all scholars concerned with liturgy or inauguration.

    See for example: C. Baethgen Berlin, , p. The increasing complexity of the imperial inauguration rite also needs to be seen in the context of a wider drive towards codification at the papal curia. Hageneder, A. Sommerlechner, and H. Translated in J. Jahrhunderts Munich, , p.